NB: This is a blog of our personal opinions, and is provided as a brief overview of things we think you might find interesting.

  • Acute Injury Care 11 January 2019 | View comments

  • Let’s take a look at acute care. Please note that acute means very recent, it does not comment on severity. In this case, we’re talking about the first 3 days after injury, and that isn’t severe enough to justify A&E (or if they release you with nothing too much to worry about). If your problem is not improving after 3-4 days, then it may be time to seek a diagnosis with more specific advice and care.

     

    The best, and most important piece of general advice (after first aid) is POLICE:

    PROTECT – This may be a splint, or a brace; or it may be the application of common sense; basically, avoid aggravating factors; surprisingly enough, they can aggravate things.

    OPTIMAL LOADING – Movement is essential to allow full perfusion of oxygen and nutrients (and white blood cells and serum), allow the body to actively heal itself, and minimise scar formation; this also means not to be afraid to use the injured area – let the pain guide you here; just don’t over-load things either. NB: We used to call this “Rest”, but too many people took us too literally, and assumed it meant bed rest.

    ICE – Real ice is better than fake cold from gels and sprays; but often less convenient. Always wrap your ice pack in a thin layer of dry material; this prevents you getting an ice burn. For the first day or so use it in bursts of <5 minutes, repeating every 20-30 minutes. After that, use bursts of 10-15 minutes, repeating every 60-90 minutes.

    COMPRESSION – Has a dual effect, it minimizes excessive oedema, by not allowing it room to expand, and provides an element of support to a joint, allowing the ligaments more rest. Don’t wear strapping for more than a few days without seeking further advice (unless it’s bandaging for an open wound, or a broken bone, obviously).

    ELEVATION – Helps drain oedema, blood and lymph from the area, basically, try to keep the injured area higher than the heart so it can drain – obviously, easier with limbs than torso injuries; don’t use for more than a couple of days.

     

    You can find out more here:

    www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/treatments-therapies/cryotherapy-cold-therapy/rice

    www.physioadvisor.com.au/health/injury-rehabilitation/rice

    Acute Injury Care

    Acute Injury Care

    Acute Injury Care

    At Back In Action we also offer free consultations. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your free no obligation consultation.

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