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Tewkesbury’s local experts in clinical chiropractic & remedial massage.

Call today on 01684 291 261 to arrange a free chat with Aidan (our chiropractor).
We'll let you know if we can help you, and if we can't, who can.

NB: This is a blog of our personal opinions, and is provided as a brief overview of things we think you might find interesting.

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  • Lower Core 25 April 2020 | Comments (0)

    Strength training of core musclesLet’s take a look at core strength and stability for the pelvic girdle and low back.

    First of all – what is meant by your Core Musculature? Well, this largely depends on who you ask. As physical therapists, we mean the deep muscles that stabilise your body, and allow other, larger muscles to create movement from a firm base – the foundations if you like. The 2 most important areas for this core stability are for the shoulder girdle and neck; and for the pelvic girdle and lower back (the subject of this post).

    As humans, we stand upright, using our spine as a pillar, which needs to be supported to stay that way; that support largely comes from the deep intrinsic lumbar muscle group (especially multifidus) which tether each vertebra onto the one below, alongside the Deep intrinsic lumbar musclestransverse abdominus muscle which acts more like a weight-lifter’s belt… that’s active, in the right place, and with you 100% of the time; these are “backed up” by the diaphragm and pelvic floor musculature.

    Unfortunately, the deep intrinsic muscles are directly inhibited by pain in the lumbar or pelvic areas, and waste away quite quickly; it is also a muscle group for which you have limited to no conscious control. Despite lacking control over these muscles, they will contract alongside the transverse abdominus muscle; which is how you can go about strengthening and stabilising your spine. Once you have that stability your lumbopelvis will move more efficiently, with less chance of injury, and if/when injured, may recover more quickly.

    #LumbarStability #Core #Chiropractic #Massage #Tewkesbury

    You can find out more here:
    Stability training of core muscleswww.physioadvisor.com.au/exercises/popular-programs/core-exercises
    www.chiro-trust.org/back-pain/tried-back-pain

    At Back In Action we now offering FREE online consultations (telehealth) via ZOOM. For the time being, these are free of charge, in a bid to help the NHS – if you have a muscular or jointy pain (such as the above), try us, rather than burdening the NHS.
    These consultations can cover triage (how serious your condition is) diagnosis, and the most important aspects of treatment (education, home exercises and self-efficacy). Contact us via facebook or phone to arrange this.
    #Telehealth #SelfEfficacy #VirtualConsultations #WorkFromHome #SocialDistancing #Quarantine #MSKTriage

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    Chronic pain is often an over-active protection mechanismLet’s take a look at the perception of chronic pain.

    Pain is weird, brains are weird, they don’t really know what’s going on in their own body; they have an opinion, but opinions are not the same as facts.
    First of all, there is no nerve that carries signals of “pain” from the body to the brain. The messages that nerves actually carry are things like “hot” “cold” “pressure” “stretch” or even “harm”. The brain takes these messages, and interprets them within the context that past experience provides.
    Pain, therefore, is a highly subjective, personal experience. It is easily altered by experience, hopes and fears, and even the language used when giving or receiving explanations.
    It is supposed to be.
    Pain isn’t a report on what is going on in your body – that’s the job of the nerve messages. Pain is a protective mechanism; it is supposed to make you act appropriately to the report on what is happening to your body. Pain can under-react (ignoring harmful information due to lack of experience); it can be appropriate and proportional (if you sprain an ankle, it’s supposed to hurt – to stop you doing something silly on it), or it can over-react (that chilli isn’t actually dissolving your tongue in a vat of acid).
    Pain is a construct of the brain; and brains can get… bored… and that stinging nettle rash that was nothing much, can become agonising when your brain has nothing else to think about. Pain can be learned – to prevent you from doing the same thing again. Pain can be made actively worse by worrying about it (that stinging nettle rash again, or concern about someone you know who had something similar) as you rehearse the sensation of pain.

    Pain is your brains opinion of what's happening - it's not necessarily accurateThis all means that we can feel pain in a part of the body that has no damage, most especially, we can continue to feel pain in a part of the body which used to be damaged, but in which the damage has healed. That pain is absolutely real; it’s just that the brain became so good at feeling pain there; it is now misinterpreting other signals as being painful. Essentially, it has become phobic.

    So what can we do about it?
    Well, we can retrain the brain. We can reassure the body that actually, these movements, these touches are okay. We can learn to think about the pain differently; to challenge the brain’s beliefs about what is happening. Gentle manual therapy can calm the brain’s over-reaction to stimulus. Finding things that don’t hurt (movements and exercises), and repeating them often, can push back on the boundary for what is felt as pain. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can change the way we think about the pain, and learn how to more appropriately interpret the signals arriving from the body. Even just reading this post can potentially help you understand, and feel differently about pain.

    #Pain #PainScience #PainPerception #CBT #Tewkesbury

    Find out more here:
    www.tamethebeast.orgPain is not an accurate measure of tissue health
    https://youtu.be/RYoGXv22G3k
    www.physio-pedia.com/Psychological_basis_of_pain
    https://youtu.be/C_3phB93rvI
    http://www.greglehman.ca/pain-science-workbooks/
    There's even an app for that: https://www.curablehealth.com/

    At Back In Action we now offering FREE online consultations (telehealth) via ZOOM. For the time being, these are free of charge, in a bid to help the NHS – if you have a muscular or jointy pain (such as the above), try us, rather than burdening the NHS.
    These consultations can cover triage (how serious your condition is) diagnosis, and the most important aspects of treatment (education, home exercises and self-efficacy). Contact us via facebook or phone to arrange this.
    #Telehealth #SelfEfficacy #VirtualConsultations #WorkFromHome #SocialDistancing #Quarantine #MSKTriage

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    Exercises for thoracic outlet syndromeLet's take a look at thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS).

    TOS is a term used to describe the compression of the brachial plexus; a grouping of nerves in the neck and shoulder region. Compression of these structures can cause pain, tingling, numbness and weakness from the shoulder and into the arm – often described as ‘sciatica in the arm’; but can also be felt in the neck or even into the face. Compression is usually caused by tension in the muscles that the plexus passes through or alongside, but can also come from the top ribs or joints of the neck. Symptoms are often aggravated by raising the arm/s up; this is a fairly common condition amongst people who work with their arms held highish, such as hairdressers or some machine operators, or some people locked in at home using a laptop on the kitchen table! Common causes of TOS include trauma, stress, repetitive strain, posture or Thoracic Outlet Syndromecongenital abnormalities (such as extra ribs); though sometimes the root cause is simply unknown. TOS is most common in women aged 25-45.

    Treatment is aimed at identifying and nullifying the root cause if possible; at relaxing, stretching and strengthening the muscles of the neck, or, failing that, then mobilising the joints of the neck, shoulder and upper ribs. Where TOS is caused by a congenital abnormality then referral to an orthopaedic surgeon may be warranted.
    Diagnosing TOS is often not easy, as there are so many other conditions which present similarly; such as carpal tunnel syndrome, tennis elbow or rotator cuff tear. Indeed it happens that a nerve damaged at one point becomes more susceptible to damage elsewhere along its length, this is a called a double crush injury.

    Stretches for thoracic outlet syndrome #ArmPain #Chiropractic #Massage #Tewkesbury

    You can find out more here:
    www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/sport-injuries/upper-back-neck/thoracic-outlet-syndrome
    www.chiro-trust.org/neck-pain/is-it-my-neck-or-thoracic-outlet-syndrome

    At Back In Action we now offering FREE online consultations (telehealth) via ZOOM. For the time being, these are free of charge, in a bid to help the NHS – if you have a muscular or jointy pain (such as the above), try us, rather than burdening the NHS.
    These consultations can cover triage (how serious your condition is) diagnosis, and the most important aspects of treatment (education, home exercises and self-efficacy). Contact us via facebook or phone to arrange this.
    #Telehealth #SelfEfficacy #VirtualConsultations #WorkFromHome #SocialDistancing #Quarantine #MSKTriage

    Read more ›

    Sciatica 11 April 2020 | Comments (0)

    NICE Guidelines for the treatment of low back pain with sciaticaLet’s take a look at sciatica.

    Sciatica is the term given to symptoms experienced from compression or irritation of the sciatic nerve; it is not a diagnosis so much as a collection of symptoms; so a diagnosis will still be needed before starting treatment. The sensation of sciatica will be familiar to anyone who’s banged their “funny bone”; but located in their buttock, leg, foot and sometimes the back. Different diagnoses result in different treatment plans and different expectations for recovery, same may resolve in days, whilst others may never resolve completely.

    Whilst most cases resolve within a couple of weeks; for those that do become chronic, the best thing you can do to improve the prognosis, is to start treatment sooner; which is a bit of a catch 22. SciaticaAs a rule of thumb, if the sciatica is significantly reduced after 5-6 days, then you shouldn’t need any treatment; if it is barely improved, or still worsening, then treatment might be a good idea, even if it’s just in the form of advice on how to manage the pain at home, and prevent it coming again.

    #Sciatica #Massage #Chiropractor #Tewkesbury

    You can find out more here:
    www.chiro-trust.org/back-pain/low-back-and-leg-pain-is-it-sciatica
    www.nhs.uk/conditions/sciatica/Pages/Introduction.aspx

    Sciatic nerve painAt Back In Action we now offering FREE online consultations (telehealth) via ZOOM. For the time being, these are free of charge, in a bid to help the NHS – if you have a muscular or jointy pain (such as the above), try us, rather than burdening the NHS.
    These consultations can cover triage (how serious your condition is) diagnosis, and the most important aspects of treatment (education, home exercises and self-efficacy). Contact us via facebook or phone to arrange this.
    #Telehealth #SelfEfficacy #VirtualConsultations #WorkFromHome #SocialDistancing #Quarantine #MSKTriage

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    Posture 04 April 2020 | Comments (0)

    The best posture is your next postureLet’s take a look at posture. Particularly important now that we've swapped an office desk, and "proper" chair for the kitchen table and a comfy chair.

    There is a lot of misinformation, and fear in relation to posture; but ultimately there is no such thing as a frankly “wrong posture”; or a “right posture” for that matter. What is most important is that you don’t maintain any one posture for too long. Having said that, there are variations of “relatively better posture” and “relatively worse posture” that people can use.

    The better the posture the better the bones and joints are aligned, reducing fatigue, strain and overuse. More to the point though, the better the posture, the longer you can hold that one position before fatiguing, straining or overusing your muscles, ligaments and tendons. You can have textbook perfect posture… and still develop fatigue and pain after a couple of hours; Postureor posture to make any therapist flinch… and be happy there… for a few minutes.

    The best posture is your next posture; and keeping mobile is what your muscles and joints really want – it’s what they’re for after all!
    As a rule of thumb, we recommend against holding any one posture for more than 10 minutes at a time. Where that’s not practical (long car journey, board meeting etc) then take a break every hour; and use that break to return mobility to your joints (as opposed to sitting in a different chair).

    #Posture #Ergonomics #Chiropractic #Massage #Tewkesbury

    You can find out more here:
    www.physio-pedia.com/Posture
    www.physioadvisor.com.au/health/ergonomics/posture

    At Back In Action we now offering FREE online consultations (telehealth) via ZOOM. For the time being, Mobility is Keythese are free of charge, in a bid to help the NHS – if you have a muscular or jointy pain (such as the above), try us, rather than burdening the NHS.
    These consultations can cover triage (how serious your condition is) diagnosis, and the most important aspects of treatment (education, home exercises and self-efficacy). Contact us via facebook or phone to arrange this.

    #Telehealth #SelfEfficacy #VirtualConsultations

    Read more ›

    Neck Pain 14 March 2020 | Comments (0)

    Exercises for Neck PainLet’s take a look at neck pain.

    Neck pain is common, but not normal. Causes include trauma, poor posture, muscle strain, bone abnormalities, and more, the vast majority are not serious. Diagnosing neck pain may require X-rays, MRIs, and other imaging tests, though often imaging may show abnormalities that aren’t causing any pain. Consequently, imaging is only recommended for pain that doesn’t recover in a timely fashion, is unresponsive to conservative care, or in the presence of red flag signs, symptoms or history (such as trauma, history of cancer, nightsweats etc).

    Stretching, strengthening and other similar forms of exercise are often helpful, Anatomy of the Neck and Shoulderswhilst encouraging normal movement of the head and neck is almost always essential. Neck braces, or devices that restrict movement are ONLY necessary when there’s a suspicion of fracture. Other treatments may include manipulation or mobilisation, pain relievers, massage, muscle relaxants, and other forms of treatment. As a rule of thumb, if the pain hasn’t (mostly) cleared up after a week, it may be time to seek further help; although an acute mechanically cricked neck can be seen sooner. Neck pain that is left for longer than a month has a worse prognosis, the longer it’s left for. Equally if your neck pain is associated with pain, numbness or pins and needles into the arms or legs, this may be a more serious mechanical condition, and require treatment earlier; Tesxt Neckwhilst if it’s associated with difficulty swallowing or breathing, you should get checked over by your GP.

    #NeckPain #CrickedNeck #Chiropractor #Massage #Tewkesbury

    You can find out more here:
    www.chiropractic-uk.co.uk/neck-pain
    www.chiro-trust.org/neck-pain/where-neck-pain-comes-from

    Read more ›