NB: This is a blog of our personal opinions, and is provided as a brief overview of things we think you might find interesting.

  • BlogRSS

  • Let’s take a look at piriformis syndrome.
    AKA deep gluteal syndrome (DGS).

    Piriformis syndrome is a form of sciatica where the sciatic nerve is compressed or irritated by the piriformis muscle. The piriformis muscle is a muscle deep in the buttocks and is a primary stabilizer for the hip, lifting and rotating the thigh away from the body. It is used whenever we walk, shift our weight from one foot to another, or maintain balance. Care needs to be taken with diagnosis to rule out the possibility of other structures compressing the nerve, or of simple trigger points with the muscles of the buttock which can cause pain mimicking piriformis syndrome.
    Piriformis syndrome can be either a primary or a secondary condition; and sometimes both at the same time. This means that it can happen of its own accord, and potentially cause other issues such a sprain in one of the joints of the pelvis; or it can be a reaction to another problem, such as a sprain in one of the joints in the pelvis. This can, of course, be a self-repeating cycle, creating chronicity.
    Pain is usually felt in one buttock, going down the back of the leg into the calf and foot; the leg and foot pain is often accompanied by numbness and a tingling sensation. You can even experience weakness in the muscles as well; it is often worse in the morning, whilst sitting or walking up slopes or stairs.
    The single most common cause of piriformis syndrome in men is sitting with the wallet in the back pocket. If you do this, please stop (or continue, and then pay me to tell you to stop).

    You can find out more here:
    www.physio-pedia.com/Piriformis_Syndrome
    www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/…/hip-groin-…/piriformis-syndrome

    The anatomy of piriformis syndrome

    Use a foam roller to treat piriformis syndrome

    Home stretch for the piriformis muscle

    At Back In Action we also offer free chats. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your no obligation free chat.

    Read more ›

    Let’s take a look at myofascial pain syndrome (MPS).

    MPS is a common cause of pain and is characterized by pain arising from tight bands of muscle known as trigger points, which often result in pain that is felt away from the site of injury. This pain away from the site of injury is a type of referred pain; where the brain gets a bit confused as to where the pain is coming from, such as shoulder pain as a result of liver pathology, or pain in the left arm as a result of cardiac issues. This pain tends to be dull and heavy, whilst the pain at the site of the injury itself can be dull or sharp, but is usually more intense – at least when challenged.
    Trigger Point Therapy can be very effective at relieving MPS, though it can also be a very painful treatment; it works best when combined with stretching and strengthening exercises. As always though, identification and treatment of the underlying cause leads to the best outcomes – often stress or posture related, but can be down to injury, regional pain, or something systemic like fibromyalgia.

    #TriggerPoints #MyoFascialPainSyndrome #ReferredPain #Massage #Tewkesbury

    You can find out more here:
    www.physio-pedia.com/Myofascial_pain
    www.webmd.com/pain-management/guide/myofascial-pain-syndrome

    Myofascial Pain Syndrome - trigger point pain referral from the Glute. Medius muscle

    Myosfascial Pain Syndrome - trigger point pain referral from the Scalenes muscle

    Myofascial Pain Syndrome

    At Back In Action we also offer free chats. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your no obligation free chat.

    Read more ›

    Let’s take a look at leg length inequality (LLI). AKA: Anisomelia or Leg Length Discrepency).

    NB: We do not treat leg length inequality itself; though we may be able to helpw ith some of the causes of a functional LLI.

     

    None of us are built straight; we might have a nose that points slightly to the left, an ear that’s lower than the other, or a breast that’s larger than its twin. In about 90% of us, one leg is longer that the other; and the vast majority of the time, this is not a problem. Sometimes that LLI can be functional - caused by other things such as a collapsed arch in the foot, or a muscle imbalance; whilst other times that LLI can be structural - one bone longer than the other, but accommodated by the body so that it has little or no impact upon the individual.
     

    However, a long-standing LLI can cause secondary problems elsewhere, especially the pelvis and spine, as you want your eyes level to the horizon. These problems will tend to be low-grade overuse injuries, and often misdiagnosed to start with; typically responding to treatment of the secondary issue, but recurring; or responding but not resolving.

    In the case of a functional LLI the best course of action is to identify why the LLI exists, and treat that root cause; in the case of a structural LLI (that is symptomatic), then an artificial lengthening of the short leg may be worthwhile; by the use of a heel lift, foot lift, or building up the sole of one shoe.

     

    Establishing how great the inequality is can be difficult, expensive, and often pointless; given that your body can adapt and accommodate it, it often just needs a little help. One of the best (and cheapest) ways of establishing the extent of any LLI is to simply stand on flat ground, with you pelvis and lower back freely mobile (which may or may not require treatment to achieve); and then stand with one foot raised by a pile of paper; repeat on the other side; and decide which felt more comfortable. If you do notice a beneficial difference; then alter the size of the pile of paper until it feels most “right”; and that would indicate the size of any correction you can trial to see if it works. Basic orthotics to raise the heel or foot can be bought in most pharmacists, or on Amazon; for anything more complicated we would advise consulting a podiatrist.

     

    You can find out more here:

    www.physio-pedia.com/Leg_Length_Discrepancy

    www.chiro-trust.org/advanced/the-kinetic-chain

    Function leg length inequality

    Structural leg length inequality

    Leg Length Inequality

    At Back In Action we also offer free chats. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your no obligation free chat.

    Read more ›

    TOS is a term used to describe the compression of the brachial plexus; a grouping of nerves in the neck and shoulder region. Compression of these structures can cause pain, tingling, numbness and weakness from the shoulder and into the arm – often described as ‘sciatica in the arm’; but can also be felt in the neck or even into the face. Compression is usually caused by tension in the muscles that the plexus passes through or alongside, but can also come from the top ribs or joints of the neck. Symptoms are often aggravated by raising the arm/s up; this is a fairly common condition amongst people who work with their arms held high, such as hairdressers or some machine operators. Common causes of TOS include trauma, stress, repetitive strain, posture or congenital abnormalities (such as extra ribs); though sometimes the root cause is simply unknown. TOS is most common in women aged 25-45.

     

    Treatment is aimed at identifying and nullifying the root cause if possible; at relaxing, stretching and strengthening the muscles of the neck, or, failing that, then mobilising the joints of the neck, shoulder and upper ribs. Where TOS is caused by a congenital abnormality then referral to an orthopaedic surgeon may be warranted.

    Diagnosing TOS is often not easy, as there are so many other conditions which present similarly; such as carpal tunnel syndrome, tennis elbow or rotator cuff tear. Indeed it happens that a nerve damaged at one point becomes more susceptible to damage elsewhere along its length, this is a called a double crush injury.

     

    You can find out more here:
    www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/sport-injuries/upper-back-neck/thoracic-outlet-syndrome

    www.chiro-trust.org/neck-pain/is-it-my-neck-or-thoracic-outlet-syndrome

    Forms of Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    Stretches for Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    Nerve Flossing for Thoracic Outlet Syndrome

    At Back In Action we also offer free consultations. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your free no obligation consultation.

    Read more ›

    Shin Splints 18 January 2019 | Comments (0)

    Shin splints are common in people who do a lot of springing on the balls of their feet, such as runners, tennis players and fell-walkers. They aren't usually serious, but can stop you from exercising and may get worse if you ignore them; it's important not to run through the pain. They can usually be treated at home by following the POLICE protocol, and should start to get better within a week or two.

    Shin Splints typically present with dull, diffuse pain in the inside front of the shin, which comes on during activity; which may be tender to touch. There may also be some muscle tightness, or loss of flexibility at the ankle. Although mild swelling sometimes occurs, notable swelling of the lower leg, numbness, weakness and discolouration are not associated with shin splints and should prompt evaluation for other disorders, such as compartment syndrome.

    Shin splints tend to come on with people who have recently increased their training, whilst those who over-pronate the ankle, have flat feet, or a leg length inequality are also susceptible. Running on hard, or uneven surfaces can also aggravate this condition, as can wearing older shoes which have lost their cushioning.

     

    You can find out more here:

    www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/sport-injuries/ankle-achilles-shin-pain/shin-splints

    www.physioadvisor.com.au/injuries/lower-leg/shin-splints

    Front line treatment for shin splints

    Typical presentation of shin splints

    Shin splints

    At Back In Action we also offer free consultations. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your free no obligation consultation.

    Read more ›

    Let’s take a look at acute care. Please note that acute means very recent, it does not comment on severity. In this case, we’re talking about the first 3 days after injury, and that isn’t severe enough to justify A&E (or if they release you with nothing too much to worry about). If your problem is not improving after 3-4 days, then it may be time to seek a diagnosis with more specific advice and care.

     

    The best, and most important piece of general advice (after first aid) is POLICE:

    PROTECT – This may be a splint, or a brace; or it may be the application of common sense; basically, avoid aggravating factors; surprisingly enough, they can aggravate things.

    OPTIMAL LOADING – Movement is essential to allow full perfusion of oxygen and nutrients (and white blood cells and serum), allow the body to actively heal itself, and minimise scar formation; this also means not to be afraid to use the injured area – let the pain guide you here; just don’t over-load things either. NB: We used to call this “Rest”, but too many people took us too literally, and assumed it meant bed rest.

    ICE – Real ice is better than fake cold from gels and sprays; but often less convenient. Always wrap your ice pack in a thin layer of dry material; this prevents you getting an ice burn. For the first day or so use it in bursts of <5 minutes, repeating every 20-30 minutes. After that, use bursts of 10-15 minutes, repeating every 60-90 minutes.

    COMPRESSION – Has a dual effect, it minimizes excessive oedema, by not allowing it room to expand, and provides an element of support to a joint, allowing the ligaments more rest. Don’t wear strapping for more than a few days without seeking further advice (unless it’s bandaging for an open wound, or a broken bone, obviously).

    ELEVATION – Helps drain oedema, blood and lymph from the area, basically, try to keep the injured area higher than the heart so it can drain – obviously, easier with limbs than torso injuries; don’t use for more than a couple of days.

     

    You can find out more here:

    www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/treatments-therapies/cryotherapy-cold-therapy/rice

    www.physioadvisor.com.au/health/injury-rehabilitation/rice

    Acute Injury Care

    Acute Injury Care

    Acute Injury Care

    At Back In Action we also offer free consultations. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your free no obligation consultation.

    Read more ›

    Boobs – they’re just so important, for so many of us; so let’s get a bit better at looking after them.

     

    Repetitive trauma or bouncing up and down from jogging, jumping, dancing, or many other forms of activity, can cause permanent damage resulting in breasts dropping. The breasts are composed of mainly fatty tissue with the mammary glands and muscle. The muscle is deep so cannot help much in supporting the breast. There are, however, ligaments interwoven through the breast called Coopers Ligaments, which help hold the breasts up; but they and are thin and not very strong. If the breasts are not supported properly with a good sports bra then repetitive bouncing can stretch these ligaments permanently.

     

    It is not just the larger breasted women who suffer breast pain when exercising; smaller breasted women can suffer from jogger’s breast just as much. It is also possible that breasts that are not properly supported can lead to tension and strain in the upper back and neck, particularly in the larger breasted woman. The excess weight at the front can mean the back muscles have to work harder to keep the shoulders in the correct position. Massage and posture can help reduce the tension, and pain this results in; but can’t do anything for the boobs themselves – prevention is better than cure. So wear the correct sports bra. This should give support and prevent vertical movement as well as side to side movement.

     

    There are many types of sports bra available and the most suitable for one person is not necessarily the best for another person. When choosing a sports bra you should take into account:

    Support level - this will depend on your size (larger breasts need more support) and your sport (high impact?)

    Compression or encapsulation - Compression bras basically compress the breasts against the chest and are usually crop-top styles. Encapsulation bras keep the breast separate in defined cups, more similar to a standard bra. Women with larger breasts should pick an encapsulation bra. Smaller breasted women may feel a compression bra is sufficient. A few styles both compress and encapsulate.

    Strap width - Make sure the straps are wider than a standard bra. This will help support and breasts and prevent the straps digging in.

    Material - Make sure the material is breathable and comfortable to wear. Also ensure that there are no seams on the cups which could cause nipple chafing!

     

    You can find out more here:

    www.nhs.uk/live-well/exercise/right-sports-bra-can-reduce-breast-pain

    www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/features/sports-bras

    www.chiropractic-uk.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/Mind-your-posture-bra-fitting.pdf

    The right sized sports bra will help prevent joggers' breast

    How to know your sports bra is the right size

    Sports bras should be correctly fitted

    At Back In Action we also offer free consultations. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your free no obligation consultation.

    Read more ›

    As we’re in the New Year’s Resolution time of year; let’s have a look at getting and keeping active.

     

    PE has a lot to answer for. If it brings to mind freezing changing rooms and slogging through muddy fields then it’s likely you’re not alone in those thoughts. The inspiration that PE was meant to offer a future generation to be active and stay healthy is all too often sadly lacking. It doesn’t have to be this way; exercise can = activity which can = something YOU enjoy

     

    When jobs were predominantly manual, when kids climbed trees (more often) and cars were a luxury, physical activity was a regular and normal part of life. With modern day progress has come a requirement for us to go out of our way to achieve even slightly raised heartbeats, which is a shame at best and harmful at worst; it is after all, what our bodies are naturally designed to do and many of the health epidemics – obesity, back pain, diabetes, heart disease – sweeping the modern world can be directly linked in part to our modern reduction in physical activity.

    Most people KNOW the facts and don’t need convincing that exercise will do them good. But directly opposing this knowledge are the often negative perceptions attached to exercise and the fact that many of the benefits – feeling better, living longer, being healthier – can seem abstract and indirect and don’t really cut it when faced with a comfy sofa, an unfinished box set or simply less effort expended.

    It’s possible that we’re biologically programmed to not exert ourselves unless there’s an immediate, tangible reason to do so, then there are the biases and beliefs that we’ve acquired over a lifetime and any previous negative experiences of exercise – PE yes I’m talking about you – make skipping out of the door with a huge smile in place something that even the most enthusiastic gym bunnies can struggle to achieve.

    But remember, it may not be as involved as you think. Guidelines recommend: 150 mins/week of moderate aerobic activity or 75 mins/week of vigorous aerobic activity. That’s less than 30mins/day of ‘moderate’ activity. “Moderate” means brisk walking; housework; gentle cycling (10-12mph). Moderate isn’t all that difficult to achieve and may well already be part of your day. And if not, with a little thought it probably could be. Walk or cycle instead of driving? Clean the windows or mow the lawn? ‘Vigorous’ activity requires a little more effort but make that a walk up Cleeve Hill, ride the bike a little quicker or some serious garden action and you’re there.

     

    If you enjoy it your brain will remember that enjoyment, and feed it forward into anticipation (just like trying to do something you don’t enjoy). If you don’t enjoy it, bin it; don’t let negative associations getting a grip – you’re unlikely to stick with it anyway – and save your precious time for something else.

    Not sure what you enjoy? Then be a doer; make an effort, have a think and investigate – remember it doesn’t actually have to be something that hard to do or incorporate into your life and it certainly doesn’t have to be hockey / rugby / running / swimming or whichever sport it was that put you off in the first place. Try a dance class, borrow a dog for an hour, take the kids for a bike-ride and picnic (or simply explore the pubs in surrounding villages), volunteer at the nature reserve, maybe pop down to the sailing club and try messing about on the water or join a friend who keeps blathering on about their Zumba, Pilates or Taekwon-Do… the possibilities are endless. We will all enjoy different things – find what works for you and own it; and accept that what you enjoy may not be the first thing you try.

     

    Start Small = Last Long

    If you haven’t broken into a jog since you were a slim, fit youngster then any past ‘10 miles before breakfast’ are likely to be an unrealistic target currently, leading to pain and injury if you manage even half that. Be realistic about what you think you can achieve injury-free and then reduce it slightly. If you’re not sure what you can manage then simply start very small and gradually bump up – miles, minutes, reps – from there. E.g. follow a ‘CouchTo5K’ plan to get into running, gently and realistically increasing your mileage and letting your body avoid overuse injuries by becoming gradually fitter and stronger.

    You only have to prove it to YOU

    Do whatever activity floats YOUR boat and makes YOU feel better and happier overall – remember, a brisk walk to the shops / chasing the grandkids / gardening is likely enough. There IS some effort required to get organised, get out the door and partake but choose wisely and the overall effect will be a fitter, healthier and crucially HAPPIER you.

    If you’re really struggling with motivation then consider where your mental health is at and if you think you need a helping hand, see your GP. There is no perfect way to train, no one size fits all; draw your own map and see where it takes you.

    And finally

    Chiropractic &/ Massage can play a huge part in tackling your physical niggles and advising and helping you get healthier, fitter, stronger and consequently happier. We’re here if you need us!

     

    #LoveActivity #Chiropractic #Massage #ExerciseWorks #Tewkesbury

     

    Find out more here:

    www.nhs.uk/live-well/exercise

    www.csp.org.uk/frontline/article/csp-campaign-love-activity-hate-exercise

    www.chiropractic-uk.co.uk/new-research-shows-movement-physical-activity-best-treatment-backpain

    www.gov.uk/government/publications/health-matters-getting-every-adult-active-every-day/health-matters-getting-every-adult-active-every-day

    How much physical activity should you do

    How active are we

    What counts as moderate physical activity

    What are the health benefits of physical activity

    Physical activity map

    Active travel

    At Back In Action we also offer free consultations. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your free no obligation consultation.

    Read more ›

    Let’s take a look at lower crossed syndrome (LCS).

    Lower crossed syndrome isn’t so much a diagnosis as it is a common pattern of muscular imbalance, which can cause or be caused by poor posture, and altered function of the joints in the lower spine and pelvis.

    LCS is characterised by weakness of the Lumbar flexors (abdominals), and hip extensors (gluteals); along with tightness of the lumbar extensors (erector spinae and QL), and hip flexors (iliopsoas, TFL). This muscle pattern allows the pelvis to tilt down at the front, increasing the natural arch of the lumbar spine; in turn this position often causes tightness in the hamstrings as the body tries to correct that tilt.

    Essentially, the human body is still better evolved (in some aspects) for walking around on 4 legs, rather than 2. Our animal companions have a single arch through their spine, with all the organs hanging below it, held in a cocoon of abdominal, diaphragm and pelvic floor muscles; with the deepest (transverse) layer of the abdominal muscles providing resistance against gravity. For humans, we have a reversed curve in our lower back, which allows us to walk upright; and this means that our organs hang off the front of the body. Transverse abdominus then has no gravity to resist, and no reason to hold tension; which releases tension in rectus abdominus allowing the front of the pelvis to droop away from the ribs. This drooping of the pelvis at the front; increases the arch of the lower back, encouraging the hips to hold a little flexion; so the lumbar extensors and hip flexors shorten, whilst rectus, and the hip extensors lengthen… which then leads to the cycle feeding into itself and repeating. Tightening the abs and glutes; whilst relaxing and stretching the hip flexors and lumbar extensors counters this cycle.

    You can find out more here:
    www.muscleimbalancesyndromes.com/jan…/lower-crossed-syndrome
    www.physio-pedia.com/Lower_crossed_syndrome

    Lower crossed syndrome

    Lower crossed syndrome explained

    Exercises for lower crossed syndrome

    At Back In Action we also offer free consultations. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your free no obligation consultation.

    Read more ›

    Massage 14 December 2018 | Comments (0)

    What actually is massage?

                            

    Massage is a natural therapy involved with soft tissue manipulation and has evolved over thousands of years. From ancient China to present-day Europe, it has been used for the promotion and restoration of health. Massage is a non-invasive, non-threatening and natural therapy.

                                 

    Remedial Massage

    The term "Remedial Massage" refers to a variety of techniques specifically designed to relax muscles by applying pressure to them against deeper muscles and bones, and rubbing in the same direction as the flow of blood returning to the heart. This also includes the use of deep tissue strokes, to help more chronic (long-standing) problems of the muscles, tendons and fascia.

    This type of massage helps you de-stress and relax whilst loosening muscle tissue and releasing toxins from the muscles themselves.

     

    Sport massage

    Sports massage is typically used before, during, and after athletic events. The purpose of the massage is to prepare the athlete for peak performance, to drain away fatigue, to relieve swelling, to reduce muscle tension, to promote flexibility and to prevent injuries.

    Vigorous pre-event massage helps reduce sports-related injuries by warming, stimulating and preparing muscles and joints for increased activity while more restful post-sport techniques relieve sore, overworked muscles. Note: this does not need to be pitch-side.

    Maintenance sports massage can be considered a more vigorous remedial massage.

    Like any other massage at Back In Action, the treatment will be tailored to the individual.

     

    Or just for relaxation

    People often seek massage for stress, tension, feelings of fatigue or general weariness. Massage is excellent at promoting relaxation when used in conjunction with exercise and other activities which promote physical and mental well-being.

     

    You can find out more here:

     

    www.physio-pedia.com/Massage

    www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/treatments-therapies/sports-massage

    Massage

    Massage

    Massage

     

    At Back In Action we also offer free consultations. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your free no obligation consultation.

    Read more ›

    Upper Core 07 December 2018 | Comments (0)

    Let’s take a look at core strength and stability for the shoulder girdle and neck.

     

    First of all – what is meant by your Core Musculature? Well, this largely depends on who you ask. As physical therapists, we mean the deep muscles that stabilise your body, and allow other, larger muscles to create movement from a firm base – the foundations if you like. The 2 most important areas for this core stability are for the pelvic girdle and lower back; and for the shoulder girdle and neck (the subject of this post).

     

    As humans, we’re evolved originally to be 4 legged animals, with pillars (arms), our spine suspended from here by lower shoulder stabilisers (rhomboids, lower trapezius), some animals (typically those which do not hold their body off the ground with their forelegs, eg apes, birds, aquatic mammals) further reinforced this structure by bracing from below (clavicle). The lower shoulder stabilisers are therefore postural in nature and, in bipeds, provide stability of the shoulder girdle, for the arms and neck that use that as a base. This is doubly important as the clavicle provides stability at the front upper quadrant; whilst these muscles provide stability at the lower rear quadrant of the shoulder girdle; which is great for stability. However, most of us have poor strength and control here, as our bipedal posture prefers to use the upper trapezius and levator scapula muscles to resist the downwards pull of gravity, so that muscular stability comes from the upper quadrant, alongside the clavicle; whilst the core stabilisers waste away.

     

    You can find out more here:

    www.physioadvisor.com.au/exercises/strengthening-joints/shoulder-blade

    www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/rehabilitation-exercises/shoulder-exercises/wobble-board-for-shoulders

    Muscles of the Upper Core / Shoulder Girdle

    Wall Angel Exercises to Stabilise the Upper Core / Shoulder Girdle

    The Interscapular Muscles shoulder act as a Suspension Bridge

    At Back In Action we also offer free consultations. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your free no obligation consultation.

    Read more ›

    The rotator cuff is a group of 4 muscles which hold your arm to your shoulder blade. Despite their group name they do not cause much movement of the joint, rotation or otherwise; rather they stabilise and control the movement caused by other, larger muscles.

     

    These muscles are particularly prone to overuse or repetitive injuries, traumatic tearing, or impingement from other structures. It can be cause by any repetitive action of the shoulder, fall onto the shoulder, or simply the process of aging. Often, the pain associated with this condition is experienced as an ache in the shoulder that increases to a sharper pain or catching pain with certain activities. Occasionally, pain may also be experienced in the upper arm, shoulder blade, upper back or neck. Weakness or a feeling of instability for the shoulder or arm, is often a hallmark of this condition. The POLICE protocol for tissue healing should be applied; with ice massage and the optimisation of the tissue load (rest, massage, gradual strengthening) being particularly useful forms of treatment for these conditions; whilst unresponsive cases may require steroid injections or even surgery.

     

    You can find out more here:

    www.physioadvisor.com.au/injuries/shoulder/rotator-cuff-tear

    www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/sport-injuries/shoulder-pain/rotator-cuff-strain

    www.physio-pedia.com/Calcific_Tendinopathy_of_the_Shoulder

    Right shoulder from the front

    Testing for a possible rotator cuff tear

    At Back In Action we also offer free consultations. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your free no obligation consultation.

    Read more ›
Further information about us      Our Blog
Back In Action Homepage    About Us    Chiropractic / Chiropractor    Clinical Massage, Remedial Massage, Therapeutic Massage    Price List and Opening Hours    General Advice    Contact Information