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Tewkesbury’s local experts in clinical chiropractic & remedial massage.

Call today on 01684 291 261 to arrange a free chat with Aidan (our chiropractor).
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NB: This is a blog of our personal opinions, and is provided as a brief overview of things we think you might find interesting.

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  • ITBLet’s take a look at iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS). AKA ITB friction syndrome

     

    People who participate in intense physical training, such as runners, cyclists, and military recruits, are most susceptible to ITBS. They may notice a sharp pain that comes and goes at the outside of the knee. Over time, the pain may become more pronounced.

     

    The iliotibial band is a wide strip of fibrous tissue that extends down the outside of the upper leg. It begins at the top of the pelvis, at a bony prominence called the iliac crest, and travels down the outside of the thigh, continuing over the outside of the knee joint. The bottom of the IT band attaches to the top of the tibia (shinbone). One of its functions is to help stabilize the knee joint.

    Taping for ITB

    The IT band may rub uncomfortably against the bony bump on the outside of the femur at the knee. It may also compresses other soft tissue near the knee joint, such as a bursa or fat deposits near the knee, causing painful irritation. Either of these actions may result in the IT band itself becomes inflamed or otherwise injured.

    Pain is usually felt at the outside of the knee; but can also come up the thigh, or into the side of the pelvis. When mild ITBS may only feel knee pain at the middle or end of a workout, but as the condition progresses, you may feel pain while simply walking or going down a set of stairs.

    ITB Foam Roller

    #ITB #ITBS #TPT #SportsMassage #RunnersKnee #Tewkesbury

     

    You can find out more here:

    www.physio-pedia.com/Iliotibial_Band_Syndrome

    www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/sport-injuries/knee-pain/iliotibial-band-syndrome

     

    At Back In Action we also offer free chats. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your no obligation free chat.

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    Facet Syndrome 15 February 2020 | Comments (0)

    Lumbar Facet SyndromeLet’s take a look at facet syndrome.

    Facet syndrome is the irritation of the structures that form the facet joints – the small joints in the spine, which control movement. These can be irritated by pinching or stretching of the capsular ligaments which surround the joint, as a result of repeated micro-trauma, or as a result of local inflammation. Facet syndrome classically includes pain referred away from the location of the injury, which may follow typically pain referral patterns. Pain at the site of the facet is often a local, sharp or pinching sensation, whilst the referred pain is often duller, more achey and more diffuse. Stiffness or locking of the affected joint is a common sign, and the surrounding muscles may tense up, Spinal Segmentsor even go into spasm, to protect the damaged joint. Both the original locking, and the resultant muscle spasm can result in very painful, or outright limited motion in a certain movement; and may even experience antalgia – that is, a posture or gait designed to hold a less painful position, such as leaning the body to the side; or keeping the neck flexed.

    Facet syndrome has a nasty habit of becoming a recurring problem for the individual sufferer, sometimes lasting hours, sometimes days, sometimes weeks; but often coming back. Regular exercise, and manual therapy seem to work best at reducing these recurrences.

    Facet Joint Referral Patterns#ReferredPain #Chiropractor #Massage #Tewkesbury

    You can find out more here:
    www.physio-pedia.com/Facet_Joint_Syndrome
    www.chiro-trust.org/back-pain/what-is-facet-syndrome

    At Back In Action we also offer free chats. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your no obligation free chat.

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    Neck MRI ScanLet’s take a look at cervical radiculopathy.

    Cervical radiculopathy is a disease process marked by nerve compression, typically from herniated disc material or arthritic bone spurs in the neck. Cervical radiculopathy symptoms typically include pain, weakness, or numbness in the areas served by the affected nerve. Pain can be felt in one area only, like the shoulder, or progress along the entire arm and into the hand and fingers - in the same way that knocking your “funny bone” causes symptoms at the site, and further along the length of the ulnar nerve.

    The type of pain also can vary, with some patients describing a dull, general pain. However, others describe the pain as severe burning, sharp, or knife-like. Radicular PainPatients may feel pins-and-needles tingling, which can also be accompanied by numbness. Experiencing numbness or weakness in the hand can also affect the ability to grip or lift objects, as well as to perform other daily tasks such as writing, typing, or getting dressed.

    Certain neck movements, such as bending the neck back, side to side, or rotating it, may increase the pain. Some patients report that pain decreases when they place a hand behind their head; the movement may be relieving the pressure and traction on the nerve root, which in turn lessens their symptoms.
    Cervical Disc HerniationCervical radiculopathy is not the only condition that can present like this; with other nerve entrapment sites such as carpal tunnel syndrome, or thoracic outlet syndrome potentially sounding very similar when summarised.

    #NeckPain #Disc #Arthritis #Tewkesbury

    You can find out more here:
    www.physio-pedia.com/Cervical_Radiculopathy
    www.webmd.com/pain-management/features/neck-pain#1

    At Back In Action we also offer free chats. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your no obligation free chat.

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    Runner's Knee 01 February 2020 | Comments (0)

    Exercises for PFPS / Runner's KneeLet’s take a look at patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS).
    AKA runners’ knee.

    PFPS is pain that originates between the kneecap and thighbone. The pain is felt at the front of the knee, either under or around the edges of the kneecap; it is typically more noticeable going up stairs or walking or jogging uphill. The root of patellofemoral pain can vary and may be difficult to identify.

    Potential causes include a sudden increase in training, or simple overuse for a period of time. Forces affecting the patellaMuscle imbalance that can cause the patella to aberrant gliding within its groove (patella tracking); injury elsewhere in the kinematic chain; so a sprained ankle, or a lower back problem, left for too long, may develop into knee problems. Simple body weight, especially if matched with an increase in training load, such as taking up jogging in an attempt to reduce weight. Women are more prone to PFPS than men, especially as related to patella tracking, probably due to wider hips, and consequent knee alignment, especially if coupled with a narrower stride width.Kinesiology taping for PFPS / Runner's Knee

    #PFPS #RunnersKnee #KneePain #Massage #Tewkesbury

    You can find out more here:
    www.physio-pedia.com/Patellofemoral_Pain_Syndrome
    www.webmd.com/pain-management/knee-pain/runners-knee#1

    At Back In Action we also offer free chats. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your no obligation free chat.

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    SpondylarthritisLet’s take a look at Axial Spondyloarthritis (AxSpAr)

    Axial Spondyloarthritis is a progressive form of inflammatory arthritis, which involves the spine. It affects up to 1 in 200 people in the general population, and may account for as much as 15% of cases of chronic low back pain in younger adults. Classically, it starts for no identifiable reason in the late teens or twenties, and likes affecting the sacroiliac joints at the base of the spine, usually one at a time. It can also affect any other joint in the spine and rib cage; but also the tendon attachments elsewhere in the body, especially at the heel, knee, fingers and toes. There can also be a history of inflammation in parts of the eye (uveitis), bowel (IBD) and/or skin (psoriasis).

    MRI of Axial SpondylarthritisSpinal pain will typically present in a cyclical nature, often with no identifiable reasons for periods of exacerbation; and can be combined with extreme stiffness of the lower back, and with night pain. Pain is often worse with rest, but relieved by activity / exercise, and anti-inflammatory medications such as Ibuprofen or Naproxen.

    To diagnose AxSpAr, your GP will ask you about the above common factors, and take a blood test, for genetic and inflammatory markers and refer you to a rheumatologist; who can arrange a specific type (STIR sequence) of MRI scan to make the actual diagnosis. Further imaging may be necessary to confirm which joints are affected.

    Undiagnosed and untreated, AxSpAr can result in fusion of spinal segments, bone weakening, and even fracture. Consequently, spinal manipulation as often provided by chiropractors, osteopaths and physiotherapists should not be performed, What is axial spondylarthritisthough other forms of physical therapy targeting exercise, mobility and pain relief can be appropriate for symptom relief, but only a rheumatologist can treat the underlying condition.

     

    You can find out more here:
    ww.nass.co.uk
    www.physio-pedia.com/Spondyloarthritis

    At Back In Action we also offer free chats. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your no obligation free chat.

    Read more ›

    Ehlers-Danlos is a chronic pain syndromeLet’s take a look at Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS).

    Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome is a group of inherited connective tissue disorders, caused by faulty collagen. Connective tissue helps support the skin, muscles, ligaments, and organs of the body. People who have the defect in their connective tissue associated with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome may have symptoms which include joint hypermobility, skin which is easily stretched and bruised, and fragile tissues. There are 3 common types of EDS; and 3 extremely rare, so we’ll just talk about the first 3 here. As it is genetic, this is not a condition with any cure, but it can be managed, and symptoms can be treated – typically under the management of a rheumatologist. The earlier in life a diagnosis is made, the better it can be managed.

    Hypermobility (about 1 in 10,000 people)Joint Hypermobility in Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome
    The primary symptom is generalized joint hypermobility which affects large and small joints. Joint subluxations and dislocations are a commonly recurring problem. Skin involvement (stretchiness, fragility, and bruising) is present but to varying degrees of severity, according to the Ehlers-Danlos Foundation. Musculoskeletal pain is present and can be debilitating.

    Classical (about 1 in 20,000 people)
    The primary symptom is distinctive hyperextensibility (stretchiness) of the skin along with scars, calcified hematomas, and fat-containing cysts commonly found over pressure points. Joint hypermobility is also a clinical manifestation of the Classical Type.

    Vascular (about 1 in 250,000 people)
    The vascular type is considered the most serious or severe form of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome. Ehlers-Danlos SyndromesSkin is extremely thin (veins can be seen easily through the skin) and there are distinctive facial characteristics (large eyes, thin nose, lobeless ears, short stature, and thin scalp hair). This form can be lethal, as the artery walls can be severely weakened.

    There are only about 100 cases of the other 3 types of EDS combined - worldwide.

    You can find out more here:
    www.nhs.uk/conditions/ehlers-danlos-syndromes
    www.ehlers-danlos.com/what-is-eds
    www.rcgp.org.uk/…/tool…/ehlers-danlos-syndromes-toolkit.aspx

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