NB: This is a blog of our personal opinions, and is provided as a brief overview of things we think you might find interesting.

  • BlogRSS

  • Let’s take a look at tennis elbow / golfers’ elbow.

     

    Epicondylitis is the name given to inflammation of the tendons, and where they join to the bones at the epicondyles (the bumps either side of the humerus), at the elbow. These are named by which epicondyle is effected, lateral (AKA tennis elbow) or medial (AKA golfers’ elbow). Damage is caused by contractual overloads which create microtearing and tendinous degeneration, instead of repair. Almost any repetitive / habitual one-sided movement can be the cause, whether a sport, or an occupation or hobby.

                                                

    Epicondylitis often develops over a long period of time, and its symptoms can also appear gradually. It is also common for symptoms to wax and wane over time, with flare-ups occurring during periods of increased activity. While its common symptoms are a gradual buildup of pain and stiffness, it is also possible for symptoms to be non-specific, with the only indications of the condition showing up as a drop in athletic or work performance. Common symptoms would include pain, stiffness, or a burning sensation that gradually worsens over time; typically in or just below the elbow of the dominant arm; which can often radiate further down the arm to the wrist or hand. The most useful interventions for these conditions are ice massage, which can be done at home, or the use of specific splints, or taping strategies, which can also be done at home. I would not recommend treatment from a therapist until your condition has failed to respond to the above.

     

    You can find out more here:

    Lateral Epicondylitis:

    www.physioadvisor.com.au/injuries/elbow-forearm/tennis-elbow-lateral-epicondylitis

    www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/sport-injuries/elbow-pain/tennis-elbow

    Medial Epicondylitis:

    www.physioadvisor.com.au/injuries/elbow-forearm/golfers-elbow-medial-epicondylitis

    www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/sport-injuries/elbow-pain/golfers-elbow

    Epicondylitis

    Anatomy of Epicondylitis

    Ice Massage

    At Back In Action we also offer free chats. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your no obligation free chat.

    Read more ›

    Next week is Rheumatoid Arthritis Awareness Week, so let’s take a look at rheumatoid arthritis (RA).

     

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systematic autoimmune inflammatory disease and results in persistent inflammation of synovial tissue especially of the wrists, hands and feet. Individuals with RA are 8 times more likely to have functional disability compared with adults in the general population from the same community. The structures around the joint can also be affected, like the tendon sheath, the bursa and tendons. This pathology causes pain, stiffness in the morning and after periods of inactivity, joint swelling, weakness, fatigue and restricted joint mobility leading to reduced function. Without treatment RA can lead to irreversible damage, namely deformity and finally provoke considerable physical functional loss or even permanent disability. Thus, RA causes dramatic interference with quality of life if early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are not obtained.

    NB: Whilst massage may be of some benefit, chiropractic manipulation cannot be performed in actively inflamed joints. Exercise (preferably under the guidance of a physiotherapist) is the best form of treatment to complement orthodox medical care; with hydrotherapy being particularly useful. There is no therapy that can completely heal RA. But there are treatments that achieve pain relief and the slowdown of the activity of RA to prevent disability and increase functional capacity.

     

    You can find out more here:

    www.nras.org.uk/ra-awareness-week

    www.versusarthritis.org/about-arthritis/conditions/rheumatoid-arthritis

    www.nhs.uk/conditions/Rheumatoid-arthritis/Pages/Introduction

    Effects of RA on a Joint

    Top 10 things NOT to say to someone living with CHRONIC PAIN

    Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Read more ›

    This coming week is Aromatherapy Awareness Week, so what actually is aromatherapy?

     

    Aromatherapy is usually applied through the form of massage, but can also be administered in a number of other ways (such as inhalation, compress, home remedies like creams and lotions) depending on your individual case and needs.

     

    An aromatherapy massage has the advantage of being tailored to suit the individual’s needs as everyone is different. Therefore, your therapist will recommend a custom blend just for you.

    Your therapist may recommend some home care such as specially blended essential oils to use in a bath or as an inhalation, or a handmade aromatherapy cream. These are tailored to the client’s individual needs and therefore part of the treatment.

     

    The benefits of using essential oils are as varied as the oils themselves. Also, one of the advantages of aromatherapy is that it can be tailored to address your specific needs.

    Essential oils can be useful for people of all ages to optimise well-being. The oils can have a relaxing, soothing, comforting or even uplifting nature when blended correctly by a registered aromatherapist. Some essential oils are warming, stimulating and reviving and paired with massage, they can therefore support a healthy body.

    People nowadays are becoming more health conscious and therefore choose more natural alternatives when it comes to treating ailments.

     

    With exam season upon us – how about a relaxing session to reset the mind, and de-stress the shoulders?

     

    You can find out more here:

    www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/treatments-therapies/complementary-alternative-therapies/aromatherapy

    www.ifaroma.org/us/press-and-media-office/aromatherapy-awareness-week

    www.aromatherapycouncil.org.uk/treatments

    Aromatherapy Massage

    Aromatherapy Bath

    Essential Oils

    Read more ›
    T4 syndrome, or more accurately “upper thoracic syndrome”, is a rare and perhaps under-recognized clinical entity.
    The most common cause of T4 syndrome is overuse injury and it usually seen in patients who perform excessive amounts of bending, lifting and twisting movements seen in sports such as gymnastics and pole dancing. T4 syndrome however can also occur due to impact or pressure to the spine causing damage to happen suddenly. This condition is also common in patients who have a poor posture over a period of time for example sitting at your office chair without effective back support.
    When a patient sustains T4 syndrome sprain they will begin to feel pain and often sensory symptoms such as pins and needles or numbness in their arm, often both of them. Patients are also likely to feel a pain in the back and often the neck which becomes more apparent over time as activity is resumed and the back is put under more strain. In the case of sudden impact, the pain may come on suddenly at the point of injury.
    Patients are also likely to feel pain and stiffness in the area even after activity is halted which will become more apparent first thing in the morning. In more severe cases, individuals may also feel pain in the rib cage, chest, shoulder blade or even into the legs. This syndrome is 3 times more common in women than men; and is an excellent mimic of conditions such as thoracic outlet syndrome, and various neuropathies.
     
    You can find out more here:
    www.physio-pedia.com/T4_Syndrome
    www.physioadvisor.com.au/injuries/upper-back-chest/t4-syndrome
    T4 Syndrome
    Pain Pattern in T4 Syndrome
    Wall Angels for T4 Syndrome
    At Back In Action we also offer free chats. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your no obligation free chat.
    Read more ›

    Neck pain is common, but not normal. Causes include trauma, poor posture, muscle strain, bone abnormalities, and more, the vast majority are not serious. Diagnosing neck pain may require X-rays, MRIs, and other imaging tests, though often imaging may show abnormalities that aren’t causing any pain. Consequently, imaging is only recommended for pain that doesn’t recover in a timely fashion, is unresponsive to conservative care, or in the presence of red flag signs, symptoms or history (such as trauma, history of cancer, nightsweats etc).

    Stretching, strengthening and other similar forms of exercise are often helpful, whilst encouraging normal movement of the head and neck is almost always essential. Neck braces, or devices that restrict movement are ONLY necessary when there’s a suspicion of fracture. Other treatments may include chiropractic, pain relievers, massage, muscle relaxants, and other forms of treatment. As a rule of thumb, if the pain hasn’t (mostly) cleared up after a week, it may be time to seek further help. Neck pain that is left for longer than a month has a worse prognosis, the longer it’s left for. Equally if your neck pain is associated with pain, numbness or pins and needles into the arms or legs, this may be a more serious mechanical condition, and require treatment earlier; whilst if it’s associated with difficulty swallowing or breathing, you should get checked over by your GP.

    #NeckPain #CrickedNeck #Chiropractor #Massage #Tewkesbury

    You can find out more here:
    www.chiropractic-uk.co.uk/neck-pain
    www.chiro-trust.org/neck-pain/where-neck-pain-comes-from

    Anatomy of the Neck and Shoulder

    Text Neck

    Exercises for Neck Pain

    At Back In Action we also offer free chats. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your no obligation free chat.

    Read more ›

    Today is Spinal Cord Injury Awareness Day; so let’s take a look at cauda equina syndrome (CES).

    Cauda equina syndrome is a rare and severe type of spinal stenosis where the bundle of nerve roots at the lower end of the spinal cord become compressed. Typically this compression is from a disc prolapse, but can be caused by other conditions, such as trauma, arthritis or other bone disease.

    This causes a range of problems, including saddle anaesthesia (numbness in the skin around the anus and undercarriage); loss of control or sensation for the bowel or bladder or dysfunction or loss of sensation for the sexual organs.

    These more serious symptoms may present alongside more typical pain, numbness or pins and needles into the legs; with CES particularly liking causing symptoms into both legs at the same time. Depending on the cause, these problems can come on suddenly, or gradually; and may plateau or continue to progress.

    If left untreated, these symptoms may rarely become critical, or permanent; but we have no reliable way of telling if that is going to be the case. Consequently suspicion of CES requires emergency hospital admission and scans; and will often be operated on as a matter of some urgency.

     

    You can find out more here:

    www.spinal.co.uk

    www.physio-pedia.com/Cauda_Equina_Syndrome

    www.webmd.com/back-pain/guide/cauda-equina-syndrome-overview#1

    Symptoms of Cauda Equina Syndrome

    Cauda Equina Syndrome seen on MRI

    At Back In Action we also offer free chats. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your no obligation free chat.

    NB: If you have a valid suspicion of Cauda Equina Syndrome - don't waste time coming to see us, please, go straight to A&E

    Read more ›

    This coming Sunday (12th of May) is Fibromyalgia Awareness Day, let’s take a look at fibromyalgia (FMS).

     

    Fibromyalgia syndrome affects the muscles and soft tissue. Because the classic symptoms of FMS aren't very distinctive, the condition is often misdiagnosed and misunderstood. Those common symptoms include pain and tender points, fatigue, sleep disturbance, concentration issues, anxiety or depression, morning stiffness, numbness &/ pins and needles, headaches, bowel &/ bladder issues and menstrual cramps.

    Living with fibromyalgia means making adjustments, from work through parenting responsibilities to household chores and having fun. By taking a more active role in managing your condition, you may feel a sense of control and boost your self-esteem along with your quality of life.

    Exercise such as Tai Chi, walking, swimming or dancing can boost your strength, fitness, energy levels and resilience (both mentally and physically). Diet and sleep hygiene can help with your energy levels and mental state; whilst having a support network around that you understands – or even just accepts the problem can be invaluable. Therapies like massage, acupuncture or aromatherapy can help with pain or stress relief. Others, like cognitive behavioural therapy can help you to take ownership of, and deal with your problems.

     

    Find out what really matters to you, and the people you care about; then plan your activities and save your energy to be at your best for those times.

     

    FMS is NOT just one condition; it is a complex syndrome involving many different factors that can severely impact and disrupt a person’s daily life.

     

    You can find out more here:

    www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Fibromyalgia/Pages/Introduction

    www.chiro-trust.org/fibromyalgia/what-can-i-do-for-pain

     

    Symptoms of Fibromyalgia

    Fibromyalgia is real!

    Keep Calm and Fight Fibro

    Things NOT to say to someone with chronic pain

    NB: Whilst we may be able to provide some temporary relief for some of the symptoms of fibromyalgia, we cannot treat the condition itself.

    At Back In Action we also offer free consultations. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your free no obligation consultation.

    Read more ›

    Lyme disease is a bacterial infection spread to humans from tick bites; with an estimated 2,000-3,000 cases a year through England and Wales; with about 15% having been acquired abroad.

     

    Ticks don’t jump or fly, but climb onto you if you brush against something they’re on, typically longer grass. In the UK most ticks do not carry the Lyme-causing bacteria, so there’s no need to worry; but the longer the tick is attached for, the greater the risk, especially if the tick is attached for more than 24 hours. However, the ticks that carry Lyme are very small, and can be difficult to spot, especially if they’ve crawled to a more hidden location; bites are not painful. Having a shower can be a good idea soon after any high risk activity (hiking in long grass wearing shorts; picnic without a rug etc) as both the water, and the towel can shake them off if not firmly attached already.

     

    If you do get bitten by a tick, remove it as soon as possible using a tick removal tool, or fine tweezers. Grasp the tick as close to your skin as possible and pull upwards slowly and firmly (trying to remove the tick, not rip its body, leaving mouth parts in your skin). It’s a good idea to then clean the area with antiseptic and keep an eye on it for a few weeks for any changes. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=27McsguL2Og

     

    65-75% of cases of Lyme disease develop a circular rash in the area, which can have a distinctive “bullseye” colouration; usually appearing a couple of weeks after being bitten, and typically 6 inches in diameter. Other early symptoms include fever, sweats, chills, fatigue and pain &/ stiffness in the head, neck or back. Paralysis of facial muscles and sharp, prickly nerve pains can also occur. Many other conditions share these same symptoms, so diagnosis can be difficult; especially in the absence of a rash.

    July - September is peak season, Gloucestershire is a whole is considered medium-high risk, whilst Lyme disease is known to be carried by some of the ticks in and around Tewkesbury.

    www.nhs.uk/conditions/lyme-disease

    www.physio-pedia.com/Lyme_Disease

    www.lymediseaseuk.com

    Bullseye Rash associated with Lyme Disease

    Symptoms of Lyme Disease

    How to safely remove a tick

    NB: Whilst Lyme Disease can often present with pain and stiffness in the neck and back; chiropractic and massage are not appropriate management strategies.

    At Back In Action we also offer free consultations. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your free no obligation consultation.

    Read more ›

    Concussion 29 April 2019 | Comments (0)

    Let’s take a look at concussion, AKA mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI).

    The brain is made of soft tissue, which is cushioned by spinal fluid and encased in the protective shell of the skull. When you sustain a concussion, the impact can shake your brain, literally causing it to move around, impacting the inside of your skull. The trauma is suffered by the brain itself, and can be suffered without direct trauma to the head.

    As concussion is an injury sustained inside the skull, padding the outside of the skull (eg a scrum cap) provides no protection from concussion – no more so than padding the back of a cricket bat makes the front any less solid. It is worth noting that you can lose consciousness without suffering concussion, and can suffer concussion without losing consciousness. It is also worth noting that the victim is often the least reliable person to say if a loss of consciousness occurred. Loss of consciousness itself is considered to mean concussion until proven otherwise, but is far from the only sign to look out for.

    The principal concern with concussion isn’t so much for the concussion itself, but for potential complications; such as Post-Concussion Syndrome, Second-Impact Syndrome, Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy or Traumatic Brain Injury (that isn’t mild).
    The most immediately concerning is Second-Impact Syndrome – a second concussion suffered before the first has completely recovered. This is the reason that any sportsperson MUST be removed from the field immediately and until Return To Play Protocols have been completed if there is even a suspicion of concussion.

     

    You can find out more here:
    www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/sport-i…/head-injuries/concussion
    www.physio-pedia.com/Concussion
    www.englandrugby.com/…/pl…/player-health/concussion-headcase
    www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Concussion/Pages/Introduction.aspx

    Concussion Recogntion Tool

    Concussion can be more long-lasting in females

    Concussion pitch-side symptoms

    At Back In Action we also offer free chats. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your no obligation free chat.

    Read more ›

    Spring has sprung, the daffodils are finally out in the verges at Mitton; lawn mowers fill the air around Ashchurch. The sound of leather on willow emerges from the Vineyards; whilst the rugby club emit their final “3 cheers” of the season. Meanwhile the inhabitants of Walton Cardiff are taunted by the smell of charcoal and the promises that holds.

     

    Gardeners are out in force, and their backs are complaining about the unaccustomed activity; the fast bowler’s knees and shoulders are aching with their newfound workload, and the front row’s battered necks and spines are complaining after a long season of abuse.

     

    It’s times like this, that you can really appreciate the friendly service at a clinic such as Tewkesbury’s Back In Action (on Church Street), where the chiropractor can manoeuvre the bones and joints back into smooth motion, and the massage therapist can coax and cajole the muscles into releasing some tension and working properly again.

     

    But tread carefully, those who dare to enter there; for the unwary may be assigned a course of exercises, or given home-work to assess your strains of daily life; or, horror of horrors; be advised to drink more water, and less caffeine. For at Back In Action, our main aim is to keep you out of our offices as much as possible; to strengthen your back so that we don’t have to patch it up again later, to improve your function in daily life (and sporting performance) so that you don’t suffer an injury in the first place.

     

    If you are suffering pain from a mechanical cause, then give us a buzz on 01684 291 261 and see if we can help. If you’re unsure about your particular condition, then ask for a free chat, with no obligation, for some general advice.

    Spring in Tewkesbury

    Spring in Tewkesbury

    Spring in Tewkesbury

    For members of @Tewkesbury RFC & @Tewkesbury Cricket Club, this may also be a timely reminder that adult players receive a 1/3 discount, whilst juniors (U18) can be treated at 1/2 price.

    Read more ›

    This coming week is chiropractic awareness week, so… what actually is chiropractic?

    Typical chiropractic treatment consists of far more than the spinal manipulative therapy that most of us think of. We take an holistic approach to our patients, realising that whilst the spine may be a central source of many of our pains and problems, it is far from the only cause. We therefore assess the health status of the entire patient, not just the spine; and advise on how best to treat the whole patient. Chiropractic intervention can be active or passive; that is, it can include advice or coaching in self-care (the patient takes an active part in their care), or it can include physical therapy such as massage, manipulation, mobilisation etc (the patient is a passive participant in their care).

    You will also find that much of chiropractic care is aimed at helping you to help yourself. The chiropractor can only do so much; we can treat what needs to be treated, but for your body to heal, it needs your help. Your chiropractor may give you a wide range of advice, including the use of other therapies, of exercises you can do, or lifestyle changes that may help your body (eg the ergonomics of your car seat; or nutritional advice), or coaching/educating on things like sleep hygiene or pain science. We are more than happy to share the management of your condition, both with your GP and other therapists.

    Through all these things, we aim to aid you in maximising your recovery, minimising any future recurrence, and to help you to manage any future episodes without the need for intervention. For patients on a maintenance programme, we aim to provide relief before any pain becomes bothersome, and to remind and encourage you with self-care techniques; helping you to fulfil your potential in life.

    You can find out more here:
    www.chiropractic-uk.co.uk/chiropractic-care
    www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/treatments-therap…/…/chiropractor

    Chiropractic for Back Pain

    Evolution of Back Pain

    Chiropractic is meant to help you heal better

    Chiropractic - Evidence-Based, Patient-centered, Interprofessional, Collaborative

    At Back In Action we also offer free chats. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your no obligation free chat.

    Read more ›

    Let’s take a look at facet syndrome.

    Facet syndrome is the irritation of the structures that form the facet joints – the small joints in the spine, which control movement. These can be irritated by pinching or stretching of the capsular ligaments which surround the joint, as a result of repeated micro-trauma, or as a result of local inflammation. Facet syndrome classically includes pain referred away from the location of the injury, which may follow typically pain referral patterns. Pain at the site of the facet is often a local, sharp sensation, whilst the referred pain is often duller, more achey and more diffuse. Stiffness or locking of the affected joint is a common sign, and the surrounding muscles may tense up, or even go into spasm, to protect the damaged joint. Both the original locking, and the resultant muscle spasm can result in very painful, or outright limited motion in a certain movement; and may even experience antalgia – that is, a posture or gait designed to hold a less painful position, such as leaning the body to the side; or keeping the neck flexed.
    Facet syndrome has a nasty habit of becoming a recurring problem for the individual sufferer, sometimes lasting hours, sometimes days, sometimes weeks; but often coming back. Regular exercise, and manual therapy seem to work best at reducing these recurrences.

    You can find out more here:
    www.physio-pedia.com/Facet_Joint_Syndrome
    www.chiro-trust.org/back-pain/what-is-facet-syndrome

    Facet Syndrome

    Facet Pain Referral Patterns

    Facet Syndrome

    At Back In Action we also offer free chats. This will take about 10-15 minutes where we can talk in general terms about your condition, and see if we can point you in the right direction for treatment. Whether that is with ourselves, someone else, or on your own at home. Call today to schedule your no obligation free chat.

    Read more ›
    1 2 3 Next
Further information about us      Our Blog
Back In Action Homepage    About Us    Chiropractic / Chiropractor    Clinical Massage, Remedial Massage, Therapeutic Massage    Price List and Opening Hours    General Advice    Contact Information